DigBlog_Header2

Here at the Digitization Centre we are fascinated and excited by the vast amount of primary-source material that our digitization work exposes us to.  Whether a document of historic significance, a beautiful illustration, or even a particularly fine typeface, we are frequently amazed by the materials we’re working to share with the world.  So much so, that not only will we crowd around to ogle a particularly interesting specimen, but we’ve started decorating our workplace with copies of some of our favorites.  But why stop there?  Surely, we can’t be the only ones geeky enough to appreciate such “gems” in our collections, and so we’ve decided to share them here with you.  Below you will find some of our favorites, hand-picked by staff from both existing and upcoming collections.  We hope you enjoy them as much as we do!   TIP: To view full resolution versions of the images on any size screen, click to enlarge and then right-click and select “open image in new tab.”


Behind the Scenes: Digitizing the RCMP

Posted on March 4, 2016 @12:39 pm by Alexandra Kuskowski

mountie

Here at DI we occasionally get special orders for digitization. Every once and a while the orders are for pretty exciting stuff.

Recently we got an order to digitize an illustrated poster from the 1970’s about the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) in Canada currently stored in the vaults of Rare Books and Special Collections at UBC.

RCMP in BC

RCMP in BC

One interesting thing about this poster is that it has a UBC seal stamped on it. At one time many libraries UBC used seals to mark items that belonged to the library. A few libraries still do! It’s a very faint imprint in the bottom right hand corner of poster.

stamp

UBC seal!

The poster is even signed by the artist!

fullimage

The creator “Bob Hope” is up on the right hand corner

The poster had some pretty cool illustrations including a few mounted police, a seal, and a running story framing the picture.

history

Interesting seal in the bottom right hand corner of the poster

RCMP Crest

RCMP crest

We also have two cool video of the scanning process as well. The first video shows the image going through the scanner- something we’ve featured here before. The second video is what we see on a screen as we scan things- sped up of course!

No Comments


Stanley Park Pictures

Posted on February 17, 2016 @2:14 pm by Alexandra Kuskowski

One of the best things about Open Collections is the amazing amount of images and items focused on the local area. It’s easy to look back in time. Our Now & Then blog for example is a fun way to see how the UBC campus has changed.

We’re turning our time machine to another beloved local landmark, Stanley Park. The park, which was dedicated over 125 years ago in 1888, has been a gathering spot long before settlers arrived.

Originally home to First Nations peoples the park land has evidence suggesting habitation up to 3,000 years ago. At the turn of the 17th century the settlements of Whoi Whoi and Chaythoos were removed to make was for the development of the area.

The landmark of Siwash Rock, located near  Third Beach, was once called Slahkayulsh which translates to he is standing up. Oral histories relate to story of a fisherman was transformed into the rock by three brothers as punishment for immorality.

No. 63 - Siwash Rock, Stanley Park, Vancouver, B. Taken 1912

No. 63 – Siwash Rock, Stanley Park, Vancouver, B. Taken 1912

Much of the park is still densely forested. With half a million trees it’s close to what it was in the late 1800s. Some of the trees, which stand as tall as 76 meters (249 ft) and can are hundreds of years old.

cdm.chungphotos.1-0217307full

cdm.chungphotos.1-0218833full

Can you spot the men in these pictures? They are worthy of a ‘Where’s Waldo’ photo!

Many trees tourist attractions and have been for over a hundred years. Take for example the Hollow tree- which still exists in the park! Here’s a photo from over 100 years ago!

cdm.langmann.1-0053520.0047full

One famous tree landmark that is gone now but can still be seen in our photo collections is the Seven Sisters, a grouping of seven enormous trees. Legend has it that the trees were seven kind souls lined up to protect visitors from an evil soul embodied in a white rock.

cdm.rosetti.1-0040829full

So, if you have an hour or two get dressed in your Sunday best and see the park for yourself! Or explore the history of Stanley Park through Open Collections.

cdm.chungphotos.1-0219129full

 

Learn more about Stanley Park, learn about the history behind the park

No Comments


Now & Then

Posted on January 28, 2016 @9:31 am by Alexandra Kuskowski

As the end of one year approaches and the beginning of a new year sneaks up it’s always good to take a moment (or 5) to reflect.

The Digitization Centre and UBC have seen a lot of changes, this year and over time. Our new portal Open Collections premiered this year and UBC turned 100.

What’s fun about reflecting at DI is you can see a visual of how everything has changed. One of the oldest buildings on campus is our home, the Irving K Barber (IKB) Center and we’re taking the opportunity to compare a few recent photos from in and around IKB, to some digitized photos from the UBC Archives!

Main Library circa 1942

IMG_20151125_114009

IKB now and in 1948

New_oldview

View from the lawn now and in 1973

Quad walker

We hope you enjoy!

If you enjoy this blog post make sure to check out UBC Library’s post on the changing library and the evolution of libraries at UBC. Also take a look at the UBC Archives Photograph Collection!

And have a Happy New Year from everyone here at the Digitization Centre!

 

No Comments


Happy Holidays

Posted on January 7, 2016 @9:56 am by Alexandra Kuskowski

Happy Holidays everyone!

Hope you are all enjoying the holiday break. We compiled a few items for your to peruse from our collections that run in the holiday spirit. Click on any image to see it closer or download it. Hope you enjoy!

photo1

Sequoia tree with Christmas lights in front of Library

 

photo2

Prospector Christmas 1902

photo3

The British Columbia Mining Record supplement. Christmas 1900

photo

Thesis Christmas Sheet music

 

photo5

And last but not least… Angry Santa Disrecorder

 

 

No Comments


How We Digitize: Vintage Vancouver and a Video

Posted on October 31, 2016 @11:41 am by Alexandra Kuskowski

We’ve got a special treat for the blog today! An advance peek at new digitizations:

UL_1347, Vintage Vancouver circa.1925-1933

This hand tinted shot of Vancouver taken between 1925 and 1933 is from some of the Uno Langmann Collection items awaiting digitization. It is a panorama taken from the Boundary Road and Trinity Street area showing much of Vancouver proper as well as North Vancouver.

From the photo you can see a clear view of the Lions mountains. In the lower righthand side you can see what is today known as the Second Narrows train crossing bridge. It is one of the few things that date the photo. The original bridge was constructed in 1925 mainly for train travel, and was the first to connect Vancouver to the North Shore. After being hit a number of times by ships passing through  it was bought in 1933 be the government, and had a lift section added- which is not seen here.

Here’s a video of the image being scanned. Curious? Learn more about our scanners!

 

 

On the left side of the photo you can see the Giant Dipper, a rollercoaster built in 1925, in what is now the PNE, but was then known as the Vancouver Exhibition. It  was demolished in 1948 to make room for an expanding Hastings Racecourse track.

There is also something missing from this photo. The Lions Gate Bridge isn’t hidden behind the clouds, it wasn’t built until 1938.

UL_1347_002

This photo has been edited to make the image easier to see – It is extremely faint in the original scan.

Other cool things to note about this image – it was printed on the back of “Empress Jam” cardboard. Empress Manufacturing Co., Ltd.,  imported coffees and made local jams and jellies and one of the earliest and most successful of the local food supply companies.

1 Comment


Sneak Peak: 3D Digitization

Posted on February 5, 2016 @10:42 am by Alexandra Kuskowski

This week we are going give you a sneak preview of one of the coolest new machines coming soon to the Digital Initiatives, and even better a new collection we are partnering with Woodward Library!

The machine sounds about as futuristic as it gets—a 3D imager. But not to worry, it is far from HAL territory.

IMG_0806

The imager is made up of small tent, turntable, some light boxes, an image program, a Canon EOS camera.

Currently the 3D imager is being used to digitize the Memorial Artifact Collection at Woodward. The collections of 450 medical artifacts are from mainly the 19th and 20th centuries (though there are a few from as early as the the 18th century and as last as the 21st century). People from the British Columbia area, including retiring doctors and antiques collectors, donated the bulk of the collection. The items range from brass microscopes, to cough syrup bottles – with cough syrup still in them, to electroshock therapy machines

 

 

 

IMG_0810 IMG_20151127_133902

Check out one of the first items to be digitized: a Whitehead mouth gag. It was once used to hold patient’s mouths open during mouth examinations. The camera snaps each item as it rotates on the table 16 times.

It allows for cool gif’s like this! [here’s hoping this works on wordpress]

MouthGag_Whitehead

 

IMG_0805

Having a bit of fun! We hope you are too!

 

No Comments


Flickr Uploads Updates!

Posted on January 4, 2016 @9:34 am by Alexandra Kuskowski

We’ve uploaded a few new collection albums to our Flickr account! All of our Flickr account albums are curated to between 25 and 50 images that represent the collections. Check out all of our albums.

The newest collection is 50 curated bookplates from our RBSC bookplates collection. Here are a few of the images up on Flickr now.

Reminder: No known copyright restrictions. Please credit UBC Library as the image source. For more information see http://digitalcollections.library.ubc.ca/cdm/about. Date: [unknown] Notes: Pictorial bookplate. The bookplate portrays a landscape with either haystacks or large rocks in the foreground and rolling hills in the background ; Bookplate Type : Pictorial ; Bookplate Function : OwnershipPersonal Source: Original Format: University of British Columbia. Library. Rare Books and Special Collections. Thomas Murray Collection Permanent URL: http://digitalcollections.library.ubc.ca/cdm/ref/collection/bookplate/id/169

Date: [unknown]

Reminder: No known copyright restrictions. Please credit UBC Library as the image source. For more information see http://digitalcollections.library.ubc.ca/cdm/about. Date: [unknown] Notes: Printed in black ink on purple paper, this textual bookplate is framed by a single-lined border in which a circled design is place in each corner. Affixed by a paper clip to the top right corner is a square, white stamp printed in black ink. Its text is: Finsbury London / Institution, Circus. E. 642 21 days. ; Bookplate Type : Textual ; Bookplate Function : OwnershipCould possibly be related to the W.H. Smith Archive Ltd. The South West Museums Libraries & Archives Council relates the following information about this company: The family business started in London in 1792 and was called WH Smith & Son from 1846 and WH Smith & Son Ltd from 1929. It became the trading subsidiary of the public company, WH Smith & Son (Holdings) Ltd, in 1949. The styles changed to WH Smith Group plc and WH Smith Ltd in 1998 when family and business documents were placed with it. ; Manuscript Notes : A note is handwritten in pencil on the left-hand side of the bookplate. Although rendered difficult to read because of its age, it includes the following words: Besant 3 Sedley Place [Offoys?]. ; Institutional Source: Original Format: University of British Columbia. Library. Rare Books and Special Collections. Thomas Murray Collection Permanent URL: http://digitalcollections.library.ubc.ca/cdm/ref/collection/bookplate/id/244

Date: [unknown]
Notes:The family business started in London in 1792 and was called WH Smith & Son from 1846 and WH Smith & Son Ltd from 1929.

Reminder: No known copyright restrictions. Please credit UBC Library as the image source. For more information see http://digitalcollections.library.ubc.ca/cdm/about. Date: 1910 Notes: Woman is Mnemosyne, personification of memory in Greek mythology, or Vigilanza / Vigilantia wearing a loose gown and with hair tresses. Holding oil-lamp in her left hand, and closed book in her right hand. Flanking the right side of Vigilantia is an olive tree. Behind the torso of Vigilantia is a shelf of books, and behind her head is a landscape with a castle overlooking a lake, surrounded by mountains, and a cloudy sky. Ex Libris part of image. ; Bookplate Type : Pictorial ; Bookplate Function : OwnershipH.S.STVDY 1910 appears in lower-right hand corner above name. ; Personal Source: Original Format: University of British Columbia. Library. Rare Books and Special Collections. Thomas Murray Collection Permanent URL: http://digitalcollections.library.ubc.ca/cdm/ref/collection/bookplate/id/193

Date: 1910
Notes: Woman is Mnemosyne, personification of memory in Greek mythology, or Vigilanza

The other new collections include:

Epigraphic Squeezes (added to Flickr in November). Learn more about how we digitized the collection in our blog Digitizing the Ancient Past.

Reminder: No known copyright restrictions. Please credit UBC Library as the image source. For more information see http://digitalcollections.library.ubc.ca/cdm/about. Date: 199-100 BCE Alternative Title: De Hestaeensibus Category: Decrees and laws dated to the second century Language: Greek, Ancient (to 1453) Language: Title taken from Inscriptiones Graecae I2 (IG I2).Alternative title taken from Inscriptiones Graecae I3 (IG I3). Language: http://fromstonetoscreen.wordpress.com/squeeze-collection Digital Identifier: IG_I3_0041d Source: University of British Columbia. Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies. Permanent URL: http://digitalcollections.library.ubc.ca/cdm/ref/collection/squeezes/id/28

Date: 199-100 BCE
Alternative Title: De Hestaeensibus
Category: Decrees and laws dated to the second century
Language: Greek, Ancient (to 1453)

Reminder: No known copyright restrictions. Please credit UBC Library as the image source. For more information see http://digitalcollections.library.ubc.ca/cdm/about. Date: 440-439 BCE Alternative Title: Annus 15 Category: Tables of Hellenotamiae Language: Greek, Ancient (to 1453) Language: Language: http://fromstonetoscreen.wordpress.com/squeeze-collection Digital Identifier: ATL_15_I_38-44 Source: University of British Columbia. Department of Classical, Near Eastern and Religious Studies. Permanent URL: http://digitalcollections.library.ubc.ca/cdm/ref/collection/squeezes/id/727

Date: 440-439 BCE
Category: Tables of Hellenotamiae
Language: Greek, Ancient (to 1453)

Cuneiform Tablets and Papyri (added to Flickr in October)- It’s the oldest collection we have on Flickr – dating up to  Learn more about the provenance of our ancient collections by checking out our other blog posts: Relics from a Lost Age: Cuneiform Tablets & ProvenancePart 2: Mysterious HistoriesDiscover Lost Ancient Egyptian Papyri!

papyrus_002_001

[Letter from an unknown writer to his or her mother] [Page1] Alternative Title:[Greek papyri fragment] Date: [between 100 and 199?]

Screen Shot 2015-08-19 at 2.47.07 PM

[cuneiform tablet A] obverse Date: [between 2029 and 1982 BCE] Description: Originating from Umma, the tablet dates from the reign of Shulgi (also known as Dungi), King of Ur, between 2029 and 1982 B.C.E. It records the receipt of rent paid in kind to the temple authorities.

 

And last but not least One Hundred Poets Collection (added to Flickr in August).

Reminder: No known copyright restrictions. Please credit UBC Library as the image source. For more information see http://digitalcollections.library.ubc.ca/cdm/about Date: K_ka 4 [1847] Creator: Ryokutei Senryu_ shu_ ; Katsushika Manji R_jin, Ichiyo_sai Toyokuni ga Access Identifier: Mostow_006 Source: Original Format: Professor Joshua Mostow Private Collection. One Hundred Poets (Hyakunin isshu) Collection. Permanent URL: http://digitalcollections.library.ubc.ca/cdm/ref/collection/hundred/id/4456

Date: K_ka 4 [1847]
Creator: Ryokutei Senryu_ shu_ ; Katsushika Manji R_jin, Ichiyo_sai Toyokuni ga

Reminder: No known copyright restrictions. Please credit UBC Library as the image source. For more information see http://digitalcollections.library.ubc.ca/cdm/about Date: Meiji kanotomi [1881] Creator: Okada Ry_saku ; It_ Seisai egaku Access Identifier: Mostow_007 Source: Original Format: Professor Joshua Mostow Private Collection. One Hundred Poets (Hyakunin isshu) Collection. Permanent URL: http://digitalcollections.library.ubc.ca/cdm/ref/collection/hundred/id/2181

Date: Meiji kanotomi [1881]
Creator: Okada Ry_saku ; It_ Seisai egaku

 

 

No Comments


Exploring Open Collections: B.C. Books

Posted on January 4, 2016 @9:35 am by Alexandra Kuskowski

It’s time again for another “Exploring Open Collections” installment! This week we’re taking a look at one of our biggest collections (and one that’s featured) B.C. Historical Books. Previous to the Open Collections launch B.C. Historical Books was known as B.C. Bibliography and was a standalone site associated with Digital Initiatives – now it’s been incorporated into Open Collections for even more amazing search capabilities!

image 1

Click on me to see more!

Combining the tools of a bibliography (published work description) with the tools of a digital library, the we are offering a searchable database of the Bibliography of BC by digitizing as many works from this traditional print bibliography (and some additional materials) on the area.

If that’s a bit of a mouthful for you, think of it as an astonishing assembly of resources on British Columbia.

The collection is made up of everything, from the obvious (almanacs, guide books, government reports) to the surprising (albums, printings, diaries) to the downright bizarre (poems, scores!). But that’s not the most amazing part… keep reading to find out the best-kept secret of B.C. Historical Books!

To get into the collection there’s a lot of fun ways to explore including looking at the cornerstone works. All of which are clickable on the collections’ main page.

image 2

The 1,158 items began with three cornerstone works: Volume I-Laying the Foundations 1849-1899 Volume II-Navigations, Traffiques & Discoveries 1774-1848. Volume III-Years of Growth 1900-1950.

Or you can click through a visual representation of the collection!

image 3

Browse through the item covers by genre on the interactive nifty timeline.

image 4

Use it too see maps or or books of poetry

Plenty to see remains even if you stick straight to the books. Take the Klondyke souvenir a photograph book published in 1901. It has amazing high quality scans for you zoom in, check out, and even download if the fancy should strike you.

image 5 image 6 image7

But that’s not the best-kept secret about B.C. Books, not by a long shot.

The best secret is that you can search the text entire collection- all 1,158+ items- in the main search bar. Any text you see has been input into the system and can be accessed at a moments’ notice. If that doesn’t define the information age, I don’t know what does.

What is your favorite thing in B.C. books? Let us know in the comments!

No Comments


Exploring Open Collections: B.C. Historical Newspapers

Posted on January 20, 2016 @9:16 am by Alexandra Kuskowski

newspapers

To see the map for yourself or check on anything you see in this post- just click the pictures!

B.C. Historical Newspapers collection is a priceless resource for anyone interested in the history of British Columbia. In fact it is one of our most well used, well-loved collections!The [current] selection of 94 papers [and growing!] and 30,000 items reflects the social and culture life of the communities they were published in, making them invaluable to researchers, historians and curious folk alike. A resource, with the introduction of Open Collections, that just got even better!

The papers come from all around the province with titles ranging from the Abbotsford Post to Westward Ho! The dates span over a hundred years, from 1865 to 1989.

With Open Collections you can now browse through the papers by text, date, creator, through a listed scrolling bar, or even, most visually stunning, by map.

newspapersbc1

Many collections display the publisher and the published dates as you browse.

Clicking on a collection will take you to its personalized page where you can browse by date with a scrolling year bar.

boundrycrrek1

Dates the paper was published are highlighted in brown.

Clicking on a date will take you to that paper- where you are free to scroll, zoom and  download!

 

boundrycreek4

My favorite Boundary Creek page- not only does it have “all the wants of man”, but it’s got a vintage picture of what’s likely every miner living in Boundary Creek in 1896.

This collection is one that we are continually making better. Many of the papers are being updated so that you can have the best information possible, so keep checking back to see what new things you can find!

No Comments


100+ Years of the Unluckiest Day

Posted on January 4, 2016 @9:45 am by Alexandra Kuskowski

Check the date of this post Friday November 13. A special day for Triskaidekaphobes, people who fear the number 13. Traditionally, in the Western world any Friday the 13th is considered unlucky. Are you freaked out? If you are, you’re not alone. Recorded fears start as early as the 19th century, but some say the practice  may date all the way to the middle ages.

Today many people avoid trips, traveling and any number of activities- with an estimated 80 million dollars lost in revenue in a single day. Considering there is at least one and as many as three Friday the 13ths in a given year, that’s pretty significant.

This post isn’t about freaking out people dislike the most feared date of the year though, it’s about exploring the past! In the past 115 years there have been sixteen Friday November 13ths – a lot of which we can explore in the BC Historical Newspapers –and use them to discover cool features on Open Collections!

To see any of the papers in more detail – click on the image to go to the listing.

First up: The daily newspaper the Boundary Creek Times on Friday November 13, 1908.

boundry

The Friday the 13th unluckiness is in full effect with the headline “Yale-Cariboo Gone Wrong”

That type is a little small. You can toggle to the full text by clicking the paper image on the upper left hand side.

Screen Shot 2015-11-13 at 2.48.10 PM

Even better, compare the type and the paper picture by clicking the open page diagram!

Screen Shot 2015-11-13 at 2.48.40 PM

Looks like after some close reading not too much is wrong– just some everyday political corruption

Friday November 13, 1914  shows the first world war is had begun. The cartoon in the center of The Western Call has an interesting take on modernity too.

western

Note the King’s Speech in the bottom corner!

If you want to save the page click on the download button with the arrow on the upper left hand corner. It will only download the page you are on, not the whole paper.

By Friday November 13, 1925 things have cooled down. The Creston Review reports that people were able to attend whilst parties – as detailed in the upper righthand corner.

creston

Checkout the Creston Milk at 10c a quart! What a steal of the deal!

Last bust not least take a quick peek the Ubyssey from Friday November 13, 1953. The anti-red commission makes the headlines – suggesting the Cold War and fear of communists was in full effect.

ubyssey

Some other cultures point to Tuesday the 13th (Hispanic and Greek) or Friday the 17th (Italian) as bad luck- but that’s a post for another time.

Happy Friday the 13th!

No Comments


a place of mind, The University of British Columbia

UBC Library

Info:

604.822.6375
250.807.9107

Emergency Procedures | Accessibility | Contact UBC  | © Copyright The University of British Columbia